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Taking the crime out of sex workNew Zealand sex workers' fight for decriminalisation$
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Gillian Abel, Lisa Fitzgerald, and Catherine Healy

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781847423344

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847423344.001.0001

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Becoming inspectors of brothels: public health authorities' experience of implementing the Prostitution Reform Act

Becoming inspectors of brothels: public health authorities' experience of implementing the Prostitution Reform Act

Chapter:
(p.173) eleven Becoming inspectors of brothels: public health authorities' experience of implementing the Prostitution Reform Act
Source:
Taking the crime out of sex work
Author(s):

Cheryl Brunton

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847423344.003.0011

The passage of the Prostitution Reform Act (PRA) in 2003 brought with it new and unexpected responsibilities for the public-health authorities, particularly the Medical Officers of Health. The architects of the legislation saw public health as an important consideration in the regulatory reform of the sex industry. Within this context, the Medical Officers of Health were made inspectors of brothels. By making them inspectors of the sex industry, the Officers were given the power to appoint inspectors as well as submit proposed bylaws under the PRA to the local authorities. This chapter begins by tracing the statutory roles of Medical Officers of Health under the PRA. It examines the early responses of public-health authorities to the idea of implementing the legislation. Focus is particularly given to the views of Medical Officers of Health and other public- and occupational-health workers on their roles under the Act and their experience of its implementation. Included also are the several approaches undertaken by the public-health services in implementing the legislation, plus the approaches to complaints and interactions with other agencies. The latter section of the chapter focuses on and analyses the content of public-health submissions on proposed bylaws under the PRA. It also discusses the effect of these submissions on subsequent bylaws.

Keywords:   Prostitution Reform Act, public-health authorities, Medical Officers, public health, brothel inspectors, statutory roles, occupational health

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