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Evidence, policy and practiceCritical perspectives in health and social care$
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Jon Glasby

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781847423191

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847423191.001.0001

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From policy transfer to policy translation: the role of evidence in policy borrowing

From policy transfer to policy translation: the role of evidence in policy borrowing

‘If it worked for you, it’ll work for us’

Chapter:
(p.31) three From policy transfer to policy translation: the role of evidence in policy borrowing
Source:
Evidence, policy and practice
Author(s):

Catherine Needham

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847423191.003.0003

This chapter examines how policies transfer from one government department or state to another, exploring how far such moves are evidence-driven and what the mechanisms and channels of transfer are likely to be. Within health and social care, there are a number of initiatives that have been lent or borrowed — some internationally, some between departments. These include policies such as the Patient's Charter, expert patient programmes and individual budgets. An extensive literature has grown up around the concept of policy transfer to explain how transfers such as these occur, offering possible explanations about the how, why and when of transfer. However, this approach relies on a systematic account of the transfer process that has come under increasing attack. As a result, the concept of translation has developed as an alternative approach to explain why and how policies migrate from one setting to another. The chapter considers these two approaches in some depth, and then applies their insights to a case study of personal budgets in social care.

Keywords:   policy transfer, policy translation, health care policy, social policy, personal budgets, social care

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