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Towards a democratic division of labour in Europe?The Combination Model as a new integrated approach to professional and family life$
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Walter Van Dongen

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847422941

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847422941.001.0001

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The Complete Combination Model as the basis for an integrated policy in a strong democracy

The Complete Combination Model as the basis for an integrated policy in a strong democracy

Chapter:
(p.171) Five The Complete Combination Model as the basis for an integrated policy in a strong democracy
Source:
Towards a democratic division of labour in Europe?
Author(s):

Walter Van Dongen

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847422941.003.0005

This chapter presents three normative combination models for the division of professional and family labour in the future: the strong combination model, the complete combination model and the moderate combination model. To a certain extent, these models reflect the main normative views in society (variants of democracy) and the practical link with actual development. Starting from the normative perspective of a strong democracy and from actual development during the past few decades, this chapter argues that the complete combination model is the most suitable long-term policy model for all democratic welfare states. It is briefly compared with the other normative models: the combination model, the TLM model, the flexicurity model, the dual earner/dual carer model and the universal caregiver model.

Keywords:   democracy, society, societal models, Combination Model, family, division of labour, labour

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