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Changing local governance, changing citizens$
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Catherine Durose, Stephen Greasley, and Liz Richardson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847422170

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847422170.001.0001

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Citizens’ reflections on behaviour change policies

Citizens’ reflections on behaviour change policies

Chapter:
(p.156) (p.157) Nine Citizens’ reflections on behaviour change policies
Source:
Changing local governance, changing citizens
Author(s):

Rebecca Askew

Sarah Cotterill

Stephen Greasley

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847422170.003.0009

This chapter reviews behaviour-change policy. The label ‘behaviour change’ has been adopted in the policy literature for a collection of interventions that are based primarily on persuasive mechanisms. The chapter also demonstrates the experience of participants in four local behaviour-change projects to explore the implications of the projects for citizen–governance relations on the ground. The projects address various behavioural issues from fairly minor shifts in recycling behaviour all the way to engaging substance users with chaotic lives. As with all government intervention, behaviour-change policies operate in a context of resource constraints, competing demands, dispersed authority, and differing views. Flexibility and tailoring can be challenging and costly. It is therefore commendable that the local authorities in these four examples have made efforts to develop innovative strategies to allow services to adapt better to citizens' needs.

Keywords:   behaviour change, behaviour-change policies, citizen–governance relations, governance, behaviour-change projects

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