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Managing transitionsSupport for individuals at key points of change$
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Alison Petch

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421883

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421883.001.0001

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Transitions for young people with learning disabilities

Transitions for young people with learning disabilities

Chapter:
(p.41) Four Transitions for young people with learning disabilities
Source:
Managing transitions
Author(s):

Gillian MacIntyre

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421883.003.0004

Young people with learning disabilities can expect to make transitions that involve local education authorities, children's social services, adult social care, and in some cases paediatric and adult health services. This transition is a complicated process that occurs at different ages and involves different eligibility criteria, depending on which organisations are involved. This chapter explores the nature of transition from childhood to adulthood for young people with learning disabilities. It outlines their experiences of transition and examines policy responses in relation to these experiences. The chapter shows that young people with learning disabilities are often particularly vulnerable to the varying age limits and eligibility structures of different support services. They are also very much at the heart of changing expectations in terms of social inclusion, with the aspiration for exercising wider choices and accessing employment.

Keywords:   young people, learning disabilities, transitions, adulthood, experiences, age limits, eligibility structures, support services, social inclusion, employment

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