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Tackling prison overcrowdingBuild more prisons? Sentence fewer offenders?$
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Mike Hough, Rob Allen, and Enver Solomon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421104

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421104.001.0001

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Private punishment? An examination of the expansion, development and employment relations of private prisons

Private punishment? An examination of the expansion, development and employment relations of private prisons

Chapter:
(p.81) 6 Private punishment? An examination of the expansion, development and employment relations of private prisons
Source:
Tackling prison overcrowding
Author(s):

Sanjiv Sachdev

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421104.003.0006

The growth of private prisons is an important but relatively neglected issue in the discussion of private-sector involvement in public services. Despite the presence of private prisons in the UK since 1992, the implications of such prisons in relation to Prison Service workers were not significantly considered and were given scant attention. This chapter discusses the rationale for adopting private prisons. It determines the apparent attractions of these prisons and examines the centrality of competition. The chapter also discusses the main role of the labour management and the costs in private prisons. Issues on the role of trade unions are also considered, along with the employment-relations implications of these developments. Private prisons refer to those privately owned, operated, and managed under contract to the government, while Prison Service refers to the Prison Service of England and Wales.

Keywords:   private prisons, prisons, Prison Service, centrality of competition, labour management, trade unions, employment relations

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