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Devolution and social citizenship in the UK$
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Scott L. Greer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420367

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420367.001.0001

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Ever closer union: devolution, the European Union and social citizenship rights1

Ever closer union: devolution, the European Union and social citizenship rights1

Chapter:
(p.175) Ten Ever closer union: devolution, the European Union and social citizenship rights1
Source:
Devolution and social citizenship in the UK
Author(s):

Scott L. Greer

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420367.003.0010

This chapter brings the discussion of devolution and citizenship rights together with the much more extensively researched and discussed changes brought to citizenship rights by the development of the EU. The formal citizenship of the EU is a very distinctive and anorexic creature; its power is concentrated in Marshall's civil rights, its contribution to political rights is probably negative, and what is has to offer to social citizenship rights is derivative of its focus on certain civil rights. The chapter notes that the EU is a regulatory state which cannot stay within its borders. The EU's effects on social rights come from the ‘competency creep’ that leads it to regulate the welfare states of the UK in line with the civil rights movement. To see what the EU does to social citizenship, people must first examine the effects of its policies on the ability of governments to make social rights work.

Keywords:   devolution, citizenship rights, EU, civil rights, social rights

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