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ASBO nationThe criminalisation of nuisance$
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Peter Squires

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420282

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420282.001.0001

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Anti-social behaviour and minority ethnic populations

Anti-social behaviour and minority ethnic populations

Chapter:
(p.117) Six Anti-social behaviour and minority ethnic populations
Source:
ASBO nation
Author(s):

David Prior

Basia Spalek

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420282.003.0007

This chapter examines whether the post-1998 anti-social behaviour (ASB) policies and powers pose a threat to ethnic minorities in enabling people whose behaviours are perceived as ‘different’ to be labelled anti-social and subjected to further discriminatory interventions. It also explores the ways in which cultural factors (including the occupational/professional cultures of practitioners) influence the construction of the ASB ‘problem’ itself in relation to minority ethnic populations in the United Kingdom. Given the open-ended and subjective definition of anti-social behaviour in policy and practice, it is important to try to understand both how perceptions of ethnicity and faith may influence official approaches to addressing ASB and the relevance of, and meanings attached to, the phenomenon of ASB by minority ethnic populations. The chapter begins by discussing key concepts and definitions — particularly the ideas of ‘race’, ethnicity, religion and identity — before focusing on the significance of the current ‘law and order’ policy context in which constructions of and responses to anti-social behaviour in relation to minority ethnic populations need to be understood.

Keywords:   United Kingdom, anti-social behaviour, ethnic minorities, cultures, ethnicity, faith, religion, race, identity, law and order

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