Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
'Sleepwalking to segregation'?Challenging myths about race and migration$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nissa Finney

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420084

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420084.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Challenging the myth of ‘Minority White Cities’

Challenging the myth of ‘Minority White Cities’

Chapter:
7 Challenging the myth of ‘Minority White Cities’
Source:
'Sleepwalking to segregation'?
Author(s):

Nissa Finney

Ludi Simpson

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420084.003.0007

This chapter addresses fears that cities are becoming minority white. It questions why there is such fascination with this demographic ‘landmark’ and presents the best available evidence about the future pluralisation of Britain's cities. It examines the predictions and puts the evidence beside them, which demonstrates severe exaggeration. It argues that the notion of cities becoming plural in the near future is simply a convenient hook on which to hang discussion of the challenges and opportunities of future multicultural cities. It notes that the supposed nearness of the event justifies urgency for policy recommendations. It follows the trail of unsubstantiated claims copied from one news item to another to demonstrate the perpetuation of the myth. It then demonstrates the population dynamics that are changing the composition of cities, and examines more closely the population forecasts that have been completed for cities of Britain, painting the future based on evidence.

Keywords:   minority white, population forecasts, pluralisation, myth, multicultural cities, policy recommendations, population dynamics, evidence

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.