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Like Mother, Like Daughter?How Career Women Influence Their Daughters' Ambition$
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Jill Armstrong

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447334088

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447334088.001.0001

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Well-mothered daughters?

Well-mothered daughters?

Chapter:
(p.27) Two Well-mothered daughters?
Source:
Like Mother, Like Daughter?
Author(s):

Jill Armstrong

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447334088.003.0002

This chapter examines how the daughters felt about having grown up with a mother mainly working full-time or close to full-time hours. In most cases the daughters felt well mothered. The daughters demonstrated this view by recalling far fewer events when they felt compromised by the trade-offs their mothers were making than did their mothers. Most revealing was the five key ways many of the daughters offered to explain how their mothers managed the compromises involved in combining work and family life. The chapter discusses five themes: being there for the events where parents (especially mothers) were expected to be, being able to predict their mother's routine, their mother being emotionally present when at home, being cared for at home after school and being taught to be independent.

Keywords:   daughters, working mothers, family life, routine, emotional presence, independence

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