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Social Policy in a Cold ClimatePolicies and their Consequences Since the Crisis$
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Ruth Lupton, Tania Burchardt, John Hills, Kitty Stewart, and Polly Vizard

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447327714

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447327714.001.0001

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The changing structure of UK inequality since the crisis

The changing structure of UK inequality since the crisis

Chapter:
(p.267) Twelve The changing structure of UK inequality since the crisis
Source:
Social Policy in a Cold Climate
Author(s):

John Hills

Jack Cunliffe

Polina Obolenskaya

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447327714.003.0012

This chapter looks in detail at what happened after the crisis to the employment, earnings, incomes and wealth of groups of the population divided in different ways. It looks at how fortunes have varied by gender, age, ethnicity, housing tenure, region and disability status. The legacy of the crisis did not fall evenly. Gender gaps in pay remained wide, but women’s incomes tended to be more protected than men, because they were more likely to be receiving benefits or pensions. Divides by housing tenure remained and if anything widened, especially in incomes after allowing for housing costs. The experiences of different regions also differed sharply, particularly between London and the rest of the country, while inequalities within London are far greater than in any other region. The clearest change over the period was the deteriorating position of young adults, and in the growing economic gradients between younger and older people

Keywords:   Inequality, Earnings, Income, Wealth, gender and age

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