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Minority Women and AusteritySurvival and Resistance in France and Britain$
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Leah Bassel and Akwugo Emejulu

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447327134

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447327134.001.0001

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Whose crisis counts?

Whose crisis counts?

(p.33) Three Whose crisis counts?
Minority Women and Austerity

Leah Bassel

Akwugo Emejulu

Policy Press

In this chapter we examine in detail minority women’s institutionalised precarity in pre and post crisis France, England and Scotland. Even though minority women experience systemic social and economic inequalities, too often their experiences are erased or devalued by social movement allies and policymakers alike. This is political racelessness enacted through both political discourse and empirical data gathering and analysis. We argue that minority women experience a paradox of misrecognition—they are simultaneously invisible and hypervisible in the constructions of poverty, the crisis and austertiy. Using an intersectional framework, we will demonstrate how minority women, a heterogeneous group, experience systematic discrimination and multidimensional inequalities based on their race, class, gender and legal status. In this chapter we focus specifically on minority women’s experiences in the labour market as access to the labour market and the quality of available work is a key determinant of poverty and inequality. We also explore the particular ways in which minority women are either rendered invisible or hypervisible in key social policies meant to address their routinised inequalities.

Keywords:   Intersectionality, Precarity, Pre 2008 economic crisis, Post 2008 economic crisis, Routinised inequalities, Austerity, Social welfare, Labour markets, Minority women, Migrant women

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