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Corporate Elites and the Reform of Public Education$
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Helen M. Gunter, David Hall, and Michael W. Apple

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447326809

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447326809.001.0001

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Corporate elites and the student identity market

Corporate elites and the student identity market

Chapter:
(p.19) One Corporate elites and the student identity market
Source:
Corporate Elites and the Reform of Public Education
Author(s):

Patricia Burch

Andrew L. LaFave

Jahni M.A. Smith

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447326809.003.0002

This chapter focuses in on the relationships between corporate elites in the United States and two distinct aspects of that emerging landscape: a large not-for-profit firm called inBloom that stored and analyzed student data and a smaller not-for-profit firm called Geo Listening that monitors students’ public social media profiles for negative behavioural indicators. Companies rise (Geo Listening) and fall (inBloom), and we identify the contribution of how and why elite managers operate within the political context in which business operates. We examine the interplay of corporate and political elites, and we note the shift towards more regulation. The implications of this are examined, and while we recognise the dynamics of technology and corporate investment, we also conclude by asking in whose best interests are these firms acting, and who benefits most from their involvement in public education.

Keywords:   technological innovation, student identity market, political environment, markets, regulation

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