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Infrastructure in AfricaLessons for Future Development$
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Mthuli Ncube and Charles Leyeka Lufumpa

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447326632

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447326632.001.0001

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Regional integration and infrastructure connectivity in Africa

Regional integration and infrastructure connectivity in Africa

Chapter:
(p.521) Eleven Regional integration and infrastructure connectivity in Africa
Source:
Infrastructure in Africa
Author(s):

Maurice Mubila

Tito Yepes

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447326632.003.0012

Regional infrastructure is one aspect of broader regional integration. In contrast to economic or political integration, however, cooperation in infrastructure provision is easier to achieve, because benefits are more clearly defined, and countries need to cede less sovereignty. Regional infrastructure cooperation is therefore an effective initial step on the path to broader integration. Some countries have more to gain from regional integration than others. Landlocked countries depend particularly on effective road and rail corridors to the sea, as well as on intra-continental fiber-optic backbones that link them to submarine cables. Coastal countries depend particularly on sound management of water resources upstream. Small countries benefit especially from regional power trade that reduces the costs of energy supply. If regional integration provides a substantial economic dividend to some of the participating countries, designing compensation mechanisms that benefit all of them should be possible. However, financing regional public goods tend to be problematic.

Keywords:   public goods, regional infrastructure, regional integration, economic dividend, Africa

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