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Restructuring public transport through Bus Rapid TransitAn international and interdisciplinary perspective$
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Juan Carlos Munoz and Laurel Paget-Seekins

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447326168

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447326168.001.0001

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Road safety impacts of BRT and busway features

Road safety impacts of BRT and busway features

Chapter:
(p.355) Nineteen Road safety impacts of BRT and busway features
Source:
Restructuring public transport through Bus Rapid Transit
Author(s):

Nicolae Duduta

Luis Antonio Lindau

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447326168.003.0019

The increase in traffic fatalities worldwide is expected to be concentrated in low and middle-income countries, which are now experiencing a significant growth in motorization. BRTs are typically implemented on high demand corridors, particularly urban arterials, which are typically the most dangerous types of roads in urban areas. We provide an overview of the results of BRT safety impact assessments and explore the infrastructure components of BRT that contribute to the safety impacts. We conclude that the best way to design a high-performance transit system is to have an integrated approach that considers the needs of all road users and the impact of each design or operational decision on a wide range of performance indicators, including safety, operational performance, and environmental impacts. Safety is often overlooked in the planning and design of new transport infrastructure, including BRT systems. Our evidence suggests that if safety countermeasures are designed as part of an integrated approach that also considers bus operations, a BRT system can have a positive safety impact and provide a high quality service to its passengers.

Keywords:   brt, road safety, safety impact assessment

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