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Education Systems and InequalitiesInternational Comparisons$
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Andreas Hadjar and Christiane Gross

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447326106

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447326106.001.0001

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Education systems and inequality based on social origins: the impact of school expansion and design

Education systems and inequality based on social origins: the impact of school expansion and design

Chapter:
(p.135) Seven Education systems and inequality based on social origins: the impact of school expansion and design
Source:
Education Systems and Inequalities
Author(s):

Gabriele Ballarino

Fabrizio Bernardi

Nazareno Panichella

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447326106.003.0008

This work studies how the inequality of educational opportunities (IEO) is shaped by two institutional features of the educational system: its expansion, that is the extent to which individuals participate in it, and its design, or the way the process of schooling is organised. The empirical analysis is driven by a micro-level theoretical model, based on the “choice-within-constraints” paradigm, which includes both the level of participation in a given school system (or school level within a system) and its institutional features. Using data from ESS (2002-2010) and EU-SILC (2005) by means of a two steps multilevel model, empirical results confirm a negative association between school expansion and IEO in both upper secondary and tertiary education. Results concerning school design are less straightforward: a negative association was found between IEO and measures of tracking and vocational specificity, while results for standardisation change depending on the chosen indicator.

Keywords:   educational inequality, school expansion, school design, institutional features, educational opportunities

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