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Women's Emancipation and Civil Society OrganisationsChallenging or Maintaining the Status Quo?$
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Christina Schwabenland, Chris Lange, Jenny Onyx, and Sachiko Nakagawa

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447324775

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447324775.001.0001

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Flexible working practices in charities: supporting or hindering women’s emancipation in the workplace

Flexible working practices in charities: supporting or hindering women’s emancipation in the workplace

Chapter:
(p.299) Fourteen Flexible working practices in charities: supporting or hindering women’s emancipation in the workplace
Source:
Women's Emancipation and Civil Society Organisations
Author(s):

Sally A East

Gareth G Morgan

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447324775.003.0014

This chapter explores the debates and practices regarding flexible working in the context of the charity workplace, and examines the consequences of these practices for women in their dual role of adult/child-carer and employee. The arguments presented here are drawn from an original study involving 30 interviews in four medium-sized service-providing charities registered in England and Wales (East, 2013), and offer a snap-shot to help us determine whether flexible-working practices assist or impede women’s emancipation. The authors further explore why flexible-working arrangements are primarily utilised by women rather than men, asks whether women are coerced by organisational, personal or societal pressures to take the lead as primary carer, and if so, how this affects their roles in the charity workplace. The discussion touches upon the debates surrounding diversity, equity and the significance of nature versus nurture in shaping identity.

Keywords:   women, care, charity, flexible working, societal pressure

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