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Women's Emancipation and Civil Society OrganisationsChallenging or Maintaining the Status Quo?$
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Christina Schwabenland, Chris Lange, Jenny Onyx, and Sachiko Nakagawa

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447324775

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447324775.001.0001

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Working within associations: recognition in the public space for women?

Working within associations: recognition in the public space for women?

Chapter:
(p.277) Thirteen Working within associations: recognition in the public space for women?
Source:
Women's Emancipation and Civil Society Organisations
Author(s):

Annie Dussuet

Érika Flahault

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447324775.003.0013

Today, working in paid employment is the norm for women in France, and many of them are working in associations, which the authors regard as a specific type of civil society organisations. In this chapter, the authors enquire whether working in associations can lead to women’s emancipation. Firstly, they show that associations play an important economic role for women and create a particularly distinctive relationship to work, but they also emphasise the poor quality of the jobs in which women are disproportionately represented. The authors then discuss the effects of women’s employment in associations in terms of emancipation: they suggest that associations tend to maintain gendered norms rather than challenging them even when the organisations are feminist oriented. The risk is then that women may not achieve real recognition for their contribution unless the associations engage in a clear policy in favour of equality between men and women.

Keywords:   work, employment, gendered norms, recognition, associations, women, emancipation

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