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Ageing and Globalisation$
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Martin Hyde and Paul Higgs

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447322276

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447322276.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.179) Eight Conclusion
Source:
Ageing and Globalisation
Author(s):

Martin Hyde

Paul Higgs

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447322276.003.0008

This chapter draws together the evidence from the preceding chapters to evaluate the arguments set out in the book. The main conclusion is that there does not seem to be one single global time-space of later life. Yet neither is it the case that we see the continuing presence of a set of mutually exclusive time-spaces of ageing and later life contained within separate nation-states. Instead the economic, political and cultural co-ordinates of later life are located in a series of overlapping, sometimes conflicting, and sometimes co-ordinated spatial logics and temporal frames. However the chapter ultimately concludes that these findings are conditional and compel us to develop new theoretical models within gerontology which would allow us to handle the complex interrelations between these spatial logics as they develop.

Keywords:   gerontology, global, ageing, later life, spatial logics

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