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Ageing through austerityCritical perspectives from Ireland$
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Keiran Walsh, Gemma M. Carney, and Áine Ní Léime

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447316237

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447316237.001.0001

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Interrogating the ‘age-friendly community’ in austerity

Interrogating the ‘age-friendly community’ in austerity

myths, realities and the influence of place context

Chapter:
(p.79) Six Interrogating the ‘age-friendly community’ in austerity
Source:
Ageing through austerity
Author(s):

Kieran Walsh

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447316237.003.0006

As a means of strengthening older people’s environmental relationships the age-friendly concept has been applied to communities, cities and larger regions. In the current economic climate, however, enhancing the ageing in place experience is a substantial challenge. The impact of austerity on such experiences has not been considered. There are also questions on how the diversity of people and place and community change intersect to alter the meaning of ageing in place, and how social policy can support such complex interconnections between individuals and place. This chapter explores older people’s relationship with place in the context of policy driven austerity, the economic recession, and the pursuit of age-friendly communities. The chapter demonstrates the worth of exploring how cultural contexts can shape the relationship of such factors. As one of the principle sites of the age-friendly movement, and as a well-documented location of economic recession and austerity, Ireland holds particular relevance to international jurisdictions.

Keywords:   Age-friendly, Ageing in place, Economic recession, Austerity, Community, Neighbourhood

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