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Understanding youth in the global economic crisis$
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Alan France

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447315759

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447315759.001.0001

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Education and training: from public good to private responsibility

Education and training: from public good to private responsibility

Chapter:
(p.87) Four Education and training: from public good to private responsibility
Source:
Understanding youth in the global economic crisis
Author(s):

Alan France

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447315759.003.0005

This chapter explores the way neoliberalism has changed the field of practice in post-16 education and training in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. While ‘third way’ politics brought a commitment to questions of social justice, neoliberalism was hugely influential in reshaping the way that universities and vocational education and training (VET) providers were to operate. Secondly the chapter will outline the major change brought about around ‘user pays’ philosophy exploring issues of fees and student debt. While this approach has a long history in some countries, by the 21st century it was fully established in the post-16 educational and training sector and, as we shall see, since the crisis it has had substantial impacts on levels of student debt. The final section of this chapter returns us to the question of the widening participation agenda, where we will examine how effective it has been in the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand in bringing different social groups into the education and training field

Keywords:   student debt, user pays, neoliberalism

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