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Making policy moveTowards a politics of translation and assemblage$
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John Clarke, Dave Bainton, Noémi Lendvai, and Paul Stubbs

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447313366

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447313366.001.0001

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The managerialised university

The managerialised university

translating and assembling the right to manage

Chapter:
Four (p.95) The managerialised university
Source:
Making policy move
Author(s):

John Clarke

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447313366.003.0004

Chapter 4 explores how a new language – managerialism – enabled the transformation of power and authority in universities. The processes of managerialisation are explored through the changing regime of English Higher Education, drawing on vignettes from practice and other case study materials. At stake is how the internal architecture of power is remade to enable the ‘right of managers to manage’, while the language of managerialism simultaneously enables the translation of emergent external political objectives and programmes into the ‘business’ of the corporate and competitive university. The chapter takes up translation in a very specific sense: the capacity of a specific way of thinking and speaking within what appears to be a common language (English) to transform institutions, rework social relationships and remake forms of power and authority into new assemblages.

Keywords:   translation, assembling, managerialism, managers, power, authority, higher education

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