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Applying complexity theoryWhole systems approaches to criminal justice and social work$
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Aaron Pycroft and Clemens Bartollas

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447311409

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447311409.001.0001

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Probation Practice And Creativity In England And Wales: A Complex Systems Analysis

Probation Practice And Creativity In England And Wales: A Complex Systems Analysis

Chapter:
(p.199) Ten Probation Practice And Creativity In England And Wales: A Complex Systems Analysis
Source:
Applying complexity theory
Author(s):

Aaron Pycroft

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447311409.003.0011

Chapter Ten explores the changing nature of probation practice through a critical analysis of the multiple and complex roles of practitioners, who are required to be agents of public protection and enforcement, and rehabilitation. This chapter argues that the work of the Probation Service needs to be identified at three levels of a complex adaptive system: the policy system, the organisational system of the probation trust and the individual practitioner-probationer relationship. Within the context of complexity theory, arguments are made for the importance of creativity at all levels of the system and the need for positive feedback within those systems that allows organisations and practice to exist at the ‘edge of chaos’, which allows novel solutions to apparently intractable problems.

Keywords:   Probation Service, practice, public protection, enforcement, rehabilitation, complex adaptive system, practitioner-probationer relationship, creativity, edge of chaos

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