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Money for everyoneWhy we need a citizen's income$
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Malcolm Torry

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447311249

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447311249.001.0001

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A Brief Summary717

A Brief Summary717

Chapter:
(p.275) Chapter 17 A Brief Summary717
Source:
Money for everyone
Author(s):

Malcolm Torry

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447311249.003.0017

A Citizen's Income is an unconditional and nonwithdrawable income for every individual as a right of citizenship. It would ameliorate the poverty and unemployment traps, hence boosting employment; it would provide a safety net for all citizens; and it would create a platform on which all citizens could build. It would encourage both individual freedom and social cohesion. Six fundamental changes would be that citizenship would become the basis of entitlement; the individual would be the tax/benefit unit; the Citizen's Income would not be withdrawn as other income rose; availability for work rules would be abolished; access to a Citizen's Income would be easy and unconditional; and benefit levels might be indexed to earnings or to GDP per capita. Three frequently asked questions are addressed: Would people still work± They would. Is it fair to ask people in employment to pay for everyone to receive a Citizen's Income± People in work already fund means-tested benefits, which discourages self-reliance. A Citizen's Income would encourage self-reliance. Isn't guaranteeing a right to work a better way to prevent poverty± A Citizen's Income would make the labour market more free and flexible, thus improving the availability of employment.

Keywords:   Unconditional, Nonwithdrawable, Citizen's Income, Safety net, Individual freedom, Social cohesion, Availability for work rules, GDP per capita, Self-reliance, Right to work

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