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Social policies and social controlNew perspectives on the ‘not-so-big society’$
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Malcolm Harrison and Teela Sanders

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310747

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310747.001.0001

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Patient responsibilities, social determinants of health and nudges: the case of organ donation

Patient responsibilities, social determinants of health and nudges: the case of organ donation

Chapter:
(p.133) Nine Patient responsibilities, social determinants of health and nudges: the case of organ donation
Source:
Social policies and social control
Author(s):

Ana Manzano

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310747.003.0009

With reference to the specific impact on lone parents, this chapter examines the retrenchment of the notion of welfare as an entitlement that has occurred alongside an increased emphasis on the contractual nature of the relationship between citizen and state. Lone parents have received some financial assistance and been permitted to remain outside of the labour market to focus on the care of their children since the enactment of the 1948 National Assistance Act. Changes in entitlement to Income Support for lone parents under the New Labour government in 2008 represented the first time that the eligibility of lone parents to this financial assistance was restricted. The Coalition Government has further tightened the conditionality rules for lone parents. This chapter discusses these reforms alongside the increasing influence of behavioural economics, as Coalition government policy making continues to focus on exploring the ways in which conditionality can be harnessed to influence both economic and social policies. The chapter considers how this may impact on the provision of care for children as lone parents attempt to balance their responsibilities as the sole adult in the household.

Keywords:   Lone parents, Behavioural economics, Income Support, Working parents

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