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Sustainable London?The future of a global city$
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Rob Imrie and Loretta Lees

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310594

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310594.001.0001

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Sustaining a global city at work: resilient geographies of a migrant division of labour

Sustaining a global city at work: resilient geographies of a migrant division of labour

Chapter:
(p.111) Six Sustaining a global city at work: resilient geographies of a migrant division of labour
Source:
Sustainable London?
Author(s):

Cathy McIlwaine

Kavita Datta

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310594.003.0006

This chapter examines the roles of migrant workers in London's labour market and in sustaining its wealth and economic status. It highlights the changing nature of London's labour market and immigration regime during the economic downturn, the implications of this on different migrant groups and the strategies adopted by them to cope with the crisis in London. Over the past twenty years, a restructuring of the London economy, deregulation of the labour market, processes of sub-contraction, limited access to welfare and the imposition of an increasingly restrictive immigration regime have combined to produce a distinctive migrant division of labour at the bottom end of the London labour market. Research suggests that these vulnerabilities may have intensified since 2008, as job insecurity has worsened and anti-immigration sentiments have escalated.

Keywords:   London economy, restrictive immigration, global economy, migrant workers, deregulation, anti-immigration sentiments

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