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Fatherhood in the Nordic Welfare statesComparing care policies and practice$
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Guðný Björk Eydal and Tine Rostgaard

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310471

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310471.001.0001

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Negotiating leave in the workplace: leave practices and masculinity constructions among Danish fathers

Negotiating leave in the workplace: leave practices and masculinity constructions among Danish fathers

Chapter:
(p.141) Seven Negotiating leave in the workplace: leave practices and masculinity constructions among Danish fathers
Source:
Fatherhood in the Nordic Welfare states
Author(s):

Lotte Bloksgaard

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310471.003.0007

Danish fathers are among those in the Nordic countries taking least leave. Concurrently, the Danish legislation on leave does not have a ‘father’s quota’ and in Denmark leave entitlement is not only regulated by law but is also part of the various collective agreements in the occupational sectors and at the local workplace level where fathers must often negotiate leave individually. This chapter focuses on fathers’ negotiations of parental leave in three large Danish work places, offering men different leave entitlements and thereby different opportunities for leave. The chapter explores and discusses: 1) men’s leave take-up in the three work places, 2) men’s negotiations of parental leave with their superior in the work place and 3) how individual men’s constructions of leave practices and masculinity must be understood as something which is negotiated in relation to existing leave entitlements and masculinity ideals in relation to both fatherhood and work.

Keywords:   fatherhood practices, leave entitlements, negotiation, masculinity, work place, father’s quota

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