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Fatherhood in the Nordic Welfare statesComparing care policies and practice$
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Guðný Björk Eydal and Tine Rostgaard

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310471

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310471.001.0001

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Parental leave use for different fathers:

Parental leave use for different fathers:

a study of the impact of three Swedish parental leave reforms

Chapter:
(p.347) Sixteen Parental leave use for different fathers
Source:
Fatherhood in the Nordic Welfare states
Author(s):

Ann-Zofie Duvander

Mats Johansson

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310471.003.0016

This chapter investigates the potential effects of three major reforms in the Swedish parental leave for various subgroups of fathers. The reforms are the first, the second daddy’s quota month and the gender equality bonus introduced in 1995, 2002 and 2008. A difference in difference approach shows that the first daddy’s month reduced differences between fathers and mothers and also between subgroups of fathers, especially between fathers with different educational level, income and Swedish and foreign-born fathers. The second daddy’s month also reduced differences between fathers and mothers but increased differences between fathers with low income and education and the rest. The gender equality bonus did not have any direct effect for any group of fathers. The underlying trend is that on average fathers use increasing number of parental leave days but the differences between groups of fathers increase.

Keywords:   Sweden, parental leave use, gender equality, fathers, daddy’s quota

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