Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Renewing Europe's housing$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Richard Turkington and Christopher Watson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310129

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310129.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Housing renewal in Hungary: from socialist non-renovation through individual market actions to area-based public intervention

Housing renewal in Hungary: from socialist non-renovation through individual market actions to area-based public intervention

Chapter:
(p.161) Eight Housing renewal in Hungary: from socialist non-renovation through individual market actions to area-based public intervention
Source:
Renewing Europe's housing
Author(s):

Iván Tosics

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310129.003.0008

For over 40 years, housing policy in Hungary ignored housing renewal. Older housing built originally for private rental was nationalised at the end of the 1940s. Only small-scale attempts were made in the socialist period to renovate older properties, and the stock became badly deteriorated through lack of maintenance and repair. The transition in 1990 to a market-oriented system meant that most flats were transferred into condominiums, and thus returned to private ownership. The legal structure was modified in 2004 to facilitate decision making on housing renewal. In 2005, financial incentives were introduced for energy efficiency improvements in multi-family buildings, which speeded up the renovation of system-built housing on large housing estates: this was helped after 2007 by EU funding. Case studies from Budapest illustrate the different extent and types of housing renewal in the city. In the mid-2000s a new policy was introduced to manage growing inequalities, targeting renewal efforts to deprived areas, with a larger role for the municipal (city-wide) government. Pilot projects for socially sensitive renewal were supported by EU structural funds. By the mid-2010s, however, financial, political and organisational changes suggest that renewal in future is likely to focus on individual dwellings and to depend on the uncertainties of private financing.

Keywords:   socialist housing policies, privatisation, condominiums, large housing estates, energy efficiency, EU contributions, Budapest

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.