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Negotiating cohesion, inequality and changeUncomfortable positions in local government$
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Hannah Jones

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447310037

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447310037.001.0001

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“We spent a lot of time trying to be known for other things”

“We spent a lot of time trying to be known for other things”

Chapter:
(p.113) Five “We spent a lot of time trying to be known for other things”
Source:
Negotiating cohesion, inequality and change
Author(s):

Hannah Jones

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447310037.003.0006

Local policy practitioners are concerned to present a positive image of the place they represent (politically or professionally) because they perceive that its material conditions, as well as perhaps their own careers, are mediated primarily through presentation and reputation. This chapter is dedicated to understanding the metaphors which policy practitioners use to make sense of, and work within, community cohesion policy. The chapter draws on interviews with policy practitioners in Oldham, Barking and Dagenham, and Peterborough, three places, it is argued, which have become markers of particular arguments about the meaning of community cohesion, or the lack of it. In each of these places, policy practitioners suggest that they are aware of this reputation, but attempt to use it as a tool to improve the standing of their area within local government circles and beyond.

Keywords:   local government, measurement, Oldham, Barking and Dagenham, Peterborough, riots, immigration, brand, place

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