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Precarious LivesForced labour, exploitation and asylum$
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Hannah Lewis, Peter Dwyer, Stuart Hodkinson, and Louise Waite

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306900

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306900.001.0001

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Tackling the hyper-precarity trap

Tackling the hyper-precarity trap

Chapter:
(p.169) 7 Tackling the hyper-precarity trap
Source:
Precarious Lives
Author(s):

Hannah Lewis

Peter Dwyer

Stuart Hodkinson

Louise Waite

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306900.003.0007

Chapter 7 concludes with a reiteration of our salient findings across the previous chapters before a consideration of the effects of the global financial and economic crisis for hyper-precarious migrants, where we speculate that workplace conditions, if anything, may be worsening. We then discuss suggested interventions for policy-makers and practitioners that are deemed useful to reduce exploitative and forced labour. We here make the critical point that refugees and asylum seekers are part of a much larger group of vulnerable migrant workers in the UK whose commonplace exploitation within labour markets is mediated and structured by the interplay of broader political, economic, social and gendered processes. As such, we suggest a multi-layered approach to tackling exploitation and forced labour that combines a focus on immigration policy solutions and employer sanctions to build and enhance universal rights for all migrant workers, together with improving asylum seekers and refugees’ mobilisation opportunities and access to information in order to exercise their particular agency and rights.

Keywords:   precarity, economic crisis, regularisation, organising

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