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Combining paid work and family carePolicies and experiences in international perspective$
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Teppo Kroger and Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306818

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.001.0001

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Reconciling work and care for parent-carers of disabled children in Australia and England: uncertain progress

Reconciling work and care for parent-carers of disabled children in Australia and England: uncertain progress

Chapter:
(p.125) Seven Reconciling work and care for parent-carers of disabled children in Australia and England: uncertain progress
Source:
Combining paid work and family care
Author(s):

Sue Yeandle

kylie valentine

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.003.0007

This chapter focuses on issues for parents of disabled children in reconciling work and care in Australia and England. It considers the prevalence of disability among children and points out that in both countries almost all children with disabilities live with their parents. The chapter highlights the financial difficulties many parents face when raising a disabled child, noting that in their case parental financial and caring investments often involve life-long commitments to their child’s wellbeing, and the impact their care frequently has on their opportunities to participate in paid work. The chapter shows that women are particularly affected by work-care reconciliation difficulties in such families, which often find that the services and support their children need are offered in ways which make combining work and care difficult. Attention is drawn to the shifting policy agenda affecting families with disabled children in both countries, which includes both improvements in and risks for, these families in changing socio-economic contexts. While in both countries parents in these families have been accorded some employment rights in recognition of their additional needs, they are still left at a significant economic and labour market disadvantage compared with other parents.

Keywords:   Disabled children, Parent-carers, Work-care reconciliation, Employment rights, Australia, England

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