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Combining paid work and family carePolicies and experiences in international perspective$
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Teppo Kroger and Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306818

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.001.0001

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Struggling for recognition: working carers of older people in Japan and Taiwan

Struggling for recognition: working carers of older people in Japan and Taiwan

Chapter:
(p.88) (p.89) Five Struggling for recognition: working carers of older people in Japan and Taiwan
Source:
Combining paid work and family care
Author(s):

Frank T.Y. Wang

Masaya Shimmei

Yoshiko Yamada

Machiko Osawa

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.003.0005

Japan and Taiwan are deeply influenced by Confucian thinking which views the care of older people as a family responsibility and frames care as a private issue rather than a public matter. The chapter explores similarities and differences in both countries’ changing systems of care for older people. It analyses the processes involved in securing carers’ rights through a struggle between the state and the carers’ movement, in which shifting carer subjectivities are shaped by discourses of rights and duties.

Keywords:   Family ideology, Unpaid care work, Women’s movement, Carers’ movement, Migrant care worker, De-familialisation, Long Term Care Insurance, Japan, Taiwan

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