Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Combining paid work and family carePolicies and experiences in international perspective$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Teppo Kroger and Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306818

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Reconciling work and care for older parents, disabled children and partners: convergent or separate paths in three welfare systems?

Reconciling work and care for older parents, disabled children and partners: convergent or separate paths in three welfare systems?

Chapter:
(p.218) (p.219) Twelve Reconciling work and care for older parents, disabled children and partners: convergent or separate paths in three welfare systems?
Source:
Combining paid work and family care
Author(s):

Sue Yeandle

Teppo Kröger

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.003.0012

This chapter concludes the book, highlighting its attention to the care provided by family members of working age to people with long-term care needs in three kinds of relational context (to a parent, to a son/daughter and to a partner); its focus on the influence of carers’ organisations as well as on demographic pressures and labour market change; and its coverage of the issues arising in three types of welfare system: liberal-democratic, Nordic and East Asian. The chapter draws out the main comparative findings of the earlier chapters, highlighting both convergence and differentiation and noting that while the balance between family, private and public care provision remains very different in the three types of welfare system, all the systems considered are changing and all face common challenges which mean the prevalence of caring among people of working age is expected to rise rapidly in coming decades. This situation has already produced some similar responses: all the countries studied now offer some kinds of support to at least some family carers; all offer some employees with caring responsibilities some type of work-care reconciliation options; and in all evidence about the circumstances of working age carers is now accumulating.

Keywords:   Carers, Working age, Work-care reconciliation, Welfare systems, Comparative policy analysis, Nordic countries, East Asian countries, Liberal democracies

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.