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Combining paid work and family carePolicies and experiences in international perspective$
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Teppo Kroger and Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306818

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.001.0001

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Reconciling work and care: an international analysis

Reconciling work and care: an international analysis

Chapter:
(p.2) (p.3) One Reconciling work and care: an international analysis
Source:
Combining paid work and family care
Author(s):

Teppo Kröger

Sue Yeandle

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.003.0001

This chapter explains the book’s rationale, arguing that work-care reconciliation debates and analyses have previously drawn rather limited attention to the care given by family members of working age to relatives who need their support because of illness, disability or frailty in old age. The chapter presents data on the growing significance of work-care reconciliation, arising from both labour market and demographic change, and explains the international comparative approach taken in the book. This compares two countries in each of three types of welfare system, liberal-democratic (Australia and England); Nordic (Finland and Sweden) and East Asian (Japan and Taiwan). The chapter also explains the book’s organisation into three parts, concerned with working carers of older people, disabled children and partners where serious illness or disability raises care and support needs.

Keywords:   Caring, Paid work, Welfare systems, Older people, Disabled children, Partners, Work-care reconciliation, Comparative analysis

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