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Education without schoolsDiscovering alternatives$
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Helen E. Lees

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306412

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306412.001.0001

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School exit and home education

School exit and home education

Chapter:
(p.121) Seven School exit and home education
Source:
Education without schools
Author(s):

Helen E. Lees

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306412.003.0007

Chapter 7 covers exit from schooling attendance. Viewed through lens of Hirschman’s Exit, Voice and Loyalty theoretical framework, “school exit” is seen as deliberate (elective or desperate) act. Exit is described as a response to harms for both children and parents when schooling fails people. The chapter describes mainstream schooling’s democratic deficit and the flight to an alternative with greater voice facility. It discusses the human right to discover EHE (and other alternatives to mainstream schooling), but no practice without concept is possible. Most people are blinded by schooling as education and there is no protected right to know about other pathways. “Mu education” is discussed as a useful form of knowing without given answers, relevant to alternatives. A foreclosing lineage of school attendance expectation can be derailed by discovering education without schools. There will be a technological future linked to the likely rise in school exit. Technology as facilitating discovery of education without schools. There is a need for discovery to not just occur via word of mouth or chance for democratic equity reasons: all should have the option of alternatives.

Keywords:   human rights, Albert O. Hirschman, school exit, disaffection, voice, Mu education, foreclosure, discovery, technology, elitism

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