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Education without schoolsDiscovering alternatives$
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Helen E. Lees

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306412

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306412.001.0001

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Why is elective home education important?

Why is elective home education important?

Chapter:
(p.29) Three Why is elective home education important?
Source:
Education without schools
Author(s):

Helen E. Lees

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306412.003.0003

The chapter covers the importance of elective home education (EHE) for educational studies; how it forms a cutting edge for research about education; the nature of autonomous EHE, including freedoms and lack of hierarchies and authoritarianisms commonly found in mainstream schooling; the common ground between EHE and schooling; the tyranny of the idea that a school is needed for a successful education to occur; the compatibility of EHE with human rights ; the discussion of contentious issues around its practice; histories of confusion and ignorance about its legal status the significance of the 2009 Graham Badman Review the conflation of EHE with safe-guarding as a difficult problem; government- led championship of EHE; the marginal position of alternative educational modalities; the common ground between EHE and other radical alternatives; a discussion of the relevance of heutagogy versus pedagogy; the acceptance needed of alternatives on their own terms of the educational and EHE as courageous educational practice.

Keywords:   Elective home education, schooling tyranny, relationships, power, human rights, Badman Review, safeguarding, marginality, heutagogy

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