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Long-Term Care Reforms in OECD Countries$
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Cristiano Gori, Jose-Luis Fernandez, and Raphael Wittenberg

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447305057

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447305057.001.0001

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How different countries allocate long-term care resources to older users: changes over time

How different countries allocate long-term care resources to older users: changes over time

Chapter:
(p.77) Five How different countries allocate long-term care resources to older users: changes over time
Source:
Long-Term Care Reforms in OECD Countries
Author(s):

Cristiano Gori

Francesco Barbabella

John Campbell

Naoki Ikegami

Francesco d’Amico

Holly Holder

Tomoaki Ishibashi

Lennarth Johansson

Harriet Komisar

Hildegard Theobald

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447305057.003.0005

This chapter deals with changes over time in public resource allocation among LTC users in England, Germany, Japan, Italy, Sweden and the U.S. The dilemma on the balance between “how much care” to provide and “how many people” to reach has been the most critical issue. In institutions coverage increased everywhere up to early 2000s. Then it stopped to grow in most countries, all those where it reached a minimum threshold, and in the majority of them started to decrease. Intensity, on the other hand, augmented in all nations examined since the beginning of the century. Therefore, since then onwards intensity has been the main policy driver in institutional care in most countries, all those with coverage above a certain threshold. In care in the community instead, since the early 2000s, coverage has increased in each country of the sample and intensity has followed a mixed trend. The latter, therefore, has been everywhere the main policy driver since the beginning of the century.

Keywords:   resource allocation, coverage, intensity, care in the community, institutions

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