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Social-spatial segregationConcepts, processes and outcomes$
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Christopher D. Lloyd, Ian G. Shuttleworth, and David W. Wong

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447301356

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447301356.001.0001

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Neighbourhood racial diversity and White residential segregation in the United States1

Neighbourhood racial diversity and White residential segregation in the United States1

Chapter:
Six (p.111) Neighbourhood racial diversity and White residential segregation in the United States1
Source:
Social-spatial segregation
Author(s):

Richard Wright

Mark Ellis

Steven R. Holloway

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447301356.003.0006

This chapter uses US Census data from 1990, 2000, and 2010 to outline the changing racial profiles of large metropolitan areas focussing on the diminishing proportion of areas with white majorities. It shows that tracts which became Whiter or more Asian had higher neighbourhood incomes and tracts which became Black or Latino-dominated had lower incomes. It also shows that spatial context is important but that Whites in mainly White areas remain amongst the most economically well-off.

Keywords:   multi-ethnic, mixing, census, urban, classification

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