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Ageing in the Mediterranean$
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Joseph Troisi and Hans-Joachim von Kondratowitz

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447301066

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447301066.001.0001

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Migration, retirement and transnationalism in the Mediterranean region

Migration, retirement and transnationalism in the Mediterranean region

Chapter:
(p.173) Eight Migration, retirement and transnationalism in the Mediterranean region
Source:
Ageing in the Mediterranean
Author(s):

Claudine Attias-Donfut

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447301066.003.0008

France has for a long time, been receiving continuous waves of migrants from different countries. Initially, they came mainly from Portugal, Italy and Spain. During the second half of the 20th century, they came from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. This paper presents a comparison between these migrants according to their country of origin and to their socio-economic characteristics. This includes education, work, religion, family life and intergenerational transfers. Then the question of integration and ageing in France will be analysed in a life course perspective. The influence of the family milieu in the country of origin along with the migrant’s educational level of education, appear to be very determinant in the social success of these older immigrants in France. To assure representation, the sample was randomly selected on the basis of the population census. It includes 6200 immigrants between ages 45-70 from 12 regions in France which account for 90% of the population of immigrants in these age groups in France.

Keywords:   Migrants, France, socio-economic characteristics, life-course perspective, retirement

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