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Intergenerational relationsEuropean perspectives in family and society$
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Isabelle Albert and Dieter Ferring

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300984

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300984.001.0001

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Demographic ageing, labour market regulation and intergenerational relations

Demographic ageing, labour market regulation and intergenerational relations

Chapter:
(p.15) One Demographic ageing, labour market regulation and intergenerational relations
Source:
Intergenerational relations
Author(s):

Amílcar Moreira

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300984.003.0002

This chapter looks at how age can shape individual preferences with regard to how the functioning of labour markets should be regulated. The chapter starts by showing evidence that, contrary to what the mainstream political economy literature would suggest, age can influence individuals’ preferences for labour market regulation – namely in areas such as the level of protection in employment, or the generosity of unemployment protection. Subsequently, the chapter takes on the task of specifying the mechanisms through which age shapes individual preferences. Here, it is argued that this happens in two ways: first, age conditions a person's position in the economic cycle (education, employment, retirement), and his/her exposure to labour market risks – which s/he might want to insure against; second, age conditions a person's position in the family life-cycle (marriage, parenthood, grandparenthood), which might force him/her to consider other interests besides their own exposure to labour market risks.

Keywords:   ageing, policy-preferences, labour market, economic life-cycle, family life-cycle

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