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Intergenerational relationsEuropean perspectives in family and society$
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Isabelle Albert and Dieter Ferring

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300984

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300984.001.0001

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Family change theory: a preliminary evaluation on the basis of recent cross-cultural studies

Family change theory: a preliminary evaluation on the basis of recent cross-cultural studies

Chapter:
(p.167) Ten Family change theory: a preliminary evaluation on the basis of recent cross-cultural studies
Source:
Intergenerational relations
Author(s):

Boris Mayer

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300984.003.0011

Family change theory (Kagitcibasi, 1996, 2007) is an alternative approach to explain how modernisation and globalisation processes affect the family. The most important assumption of the theory is that when traditional interdependent cultures modernise, they need not necessarily develop in direction of an independent family model typical for Western individualistic societies. Instead, they may develop towards a family model of emotional interdependence that combines continuing emotional interdependencies in the family with declining material interdependencies and rising personal autonomy. In this chapter a preliminary evaluation of the empirical status of family change theory is given, based on a review of recent cross-cultural studies. It will be shown in how far the few studies that have been systematically conducted in this respect have found results supporting or not supporting aspects of the theory, and where the strengths and problems of this research lie.

Keywords:   family change theory, family models, cross-cultural studies, family values, value of children, independence, interdependence

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