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Values in criminology and community justice$
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Malcolm Cowburn, Marian Duggan, Anne Robinson, and Paul Senior

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300359

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300359.001.0001

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Justifying ‘green’ criminology: values and ‘taking sides’ in an ecologically informed social science

Justifying ‘green’ criminology: values and ‘taking sides’ in an ecologically informed social science

Chapter:
(p.125) Eight Justifying ‘green’ criminology: values and ‘taking sides’ in an ecologically informed social science
Source:
Values in criminology and community justice
Author(s):

Gary R. Potter

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300359.003.0008

Green criminology remains something of a niche area within criminology. Green criminologists are accused of ignoring the criminological remit by focusing also on legal harmful behaviours, of prioritising ideological concerns over the real social problem of crime, and of ’recycling’ established criminological ideas from corporate crime or organised crime. Further, green criminologists are seen to be unashamedly value-laden and political in their perspectives, prioritising concerns for the natural world over those for the social one. This chapter discusses the value positions of green criminology, arguing that although ideological influences undoubtedly exist in - and influence the work of - green criminology there is nothing inherently ideological about taking a green or ecological perspective on the social problem of ’crime’. Rather, an ecological perspective should be seen as increasingly central to any complete understanding of crime in the contemporary social world.

Keywords:   Green criminology, Environmental justice, Ecological perspective, Eco-global crime, ideological influences

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