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Values in criminology and community justice$
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Malcolm Cowburn, Marian Duggan, Anne Robinson, and Paul Senior

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300359

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300359.001.0001

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Money as the measure of man: values and value in the politics of reparation*

Money as the measure of man: values and value in the politics of reparation*

Chapter:
(p.255) Fifteen Money as the measure of man: values and value in the politics of reparation*
Source:
Values in criminology and community justice
Author(s):

Claire Moon

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300359.003.0015

This chapter looks at reparations made to victims of atrocities. It looks in particular at the significance and meaning of reparative values and practices, which are often part of the process of reckoning with past state crimes, with reference to transitional justice processes in Argentina and South Africa. The chapter critiques both ‘values’—the normative dimensions of reconciliation—and ‘value’—as compensation—in repairing the crimes of the past by investigating cases where victim groups have contested, and even refused, reparatory attempts. By analysing the reception of reparations by victims, this chapter advances a rethinking of the normative terrain and practices of power upon which reconciliatory politics is predicated. In so doing, it outlines the ways in which reparations can also perform as social control mechanisms that delimit victim claims to justice. It also attends to what these cases tell us about the social and political power that humanitarian—specifically reparative—values accrue at particular historical junctures.

Keywords:   Reparation, Reconciliation, Compensation, Restorative justice, Transitional justice, South Africa, Argentina, Social control

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