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Inclusive equalityA vision for social justice$
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Sally Witcher

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300038

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300038.001.0001

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Inclusive policy processes

Inclusive policy processes

Chapter:
(p.155) Six Inclusive policy processes
Source:
Inclusive equality
Author(s):

Sally Witcher

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300038.003.0006

Distributive processes have been a recurrent theme. The chapter explores the implications of previous insights for the design and delivery of social welfare policy, its distributive processes and the relationships through which they are enacted. The role of institutions is discussed if they are to promote inclusive equality and enable people to maximize social realization and realize capabilities, rather than be the means of imposing the decisions of the powerful onto the powerless. The importance of accommodating needs of all kinds is highlighted. Given their role in capacity-building/retention, the design and delivery of welfare goods is pivotal to promoting inclusion or entrenching exclusion. Distributive processes can be deconstructed into stages and roles. A traditional hierarchical model is described and compared to an inclusive model. Application of theory on social levels and spheres, and on social barriers, reveal further ways of creating inclusive processes. Limitations are then explored. The features of distributive institutions in public, private and voluntary sectors are briefly reviewed and challenged. An inclusive model for social policy is then sketched out, and illustrated with broad reference to the development of healthcare strategy.

Keywords:   Distributive processes, Institutions, Welfare, Social policy

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