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Inclusive equalityA vision for social justice$
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Sally Witcher

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447300038

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447300038.001.0001

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Social justice

Social justice

Chapter:
(p.31) Two Social justice
Source:
Inclusive equality
Author(s):

Sally Witcher

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447300038.003.0002

Arguments are explored concerning the need (or otherwise) of establishing an ideal just society and fair principles for distribution, along with differing theoretical approaches to those subjects, including perfecting institutions versus ‘social realisation’ and the case for ‘public reasoning’ (Sen 2010), Rawls’ (1973) ‘veil of ignorance’ and Walzer’s distributive spheres and case for complex equality. Approaches to understanding the social meaning of goods, their practical and symbolic roles, value and priority, are similarly discussed. An alternative paradigm based on ‘cultural recognition’ has been proposed by Fraser (1997) and other feminist authors, concerned with the construction and valuing of group as opposed to class) identities. Attitudes to difference assume importance as, it is argued, does the recognition of sameness. The meaning of cultural is explored, and a case made for recognition in a wider sense. Distributive and cultural recognition paradigms have generally been held to be separate, although various proposals have been made regarding their precedence and inter-relationship. The chapter concludes with the proposition that the inter-relationship can be conceived by deconstructing the components and stages of distributive processes and identifying where scope for misrecognition intervenes.

Keywords:   Distribution, Processes, Goods, Social meaning, Culture, Recognition/Misrecognition, Difference

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